fix misspellings
authorIan Kelling <ian@iankelling.org>
Mon, 31 Oct 2016 00:23:29 +0000 (17:23 -0700)
committerIan Kelling <ian@iankelling.org>
Mon, 31 Oct 2016 00:23:29 +0000 (17:23 -0700)
README
blog/2014-08-01-publishing-my-technical-notes.md
blog/2014-08-07-python-uninstall.md
blog/2014-09-29-say-on2.md
blog/2014-10-14-on2-vote-results.md

diff --git a/README b/README
index 4aa8f6e..594e9dc 100644 (file)
--- a/README
+++ b/README
@@ -43,12 +43,13 @@ comments. With one emacs command, you get a buffer of the new comments,
 with keybinds to mark them for publishing, moderatation, banning, and
 execute changes.
 
-* Inspirations
+* Other sites that are in some way interesting:
 
 http://blog.zorinaq.com/release-of-hablog-and-new-design/?
 https://mjg59.dreamwidth.org/
 http://bettermotherfuckingwebsite.com
 https://eduardoboucas.com/blog/2015/05/11/rethinking-the-commenting-system-for-my-jekyll-site.html
+https://chris-lamb.co.uk/posts/concorde
 
 * License
 
index bcb1a8b..7733f3c 100644 (file)
@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@ so there are a lot of existing sites and sources I am going to be offloading to
 
 But I also have a vision of a site for material which doesn't fit well
 in existing sources, about any free software, and has some
-opionionatedness / style that official documentation does not generally
+opinionatedness / style that official documentation does not generally
 afford. One very common and annoying practice of people who do good
 writing on technical topics is to use a blog or site which doesn't
 invite collaboration and improvement by others. So... I've started
index 53db8e6..8564c2b 100644 (file)
@@ -8,7 +8,7 @@ comment_links:
 
 `setup.py install` is the base standard install method for Python projects. I found myself wanting to uninstall one of these projects the other day. Turns out it doesn't support uninstall, but Google's top result is a Stackoverflow answer with ~250 votes that says [it can be done no problem](https://stackoverflow.com/questions/1550226/python-setup-py-uninstall).
 
-What it doesn't say is that it will silently fail / delete the wrong files when filenames have spaces, along with other important limitations. I looked around at all the other answers and links from google and there was no better answer. How does this happen for a widely used package inluded in Python for at least [15 years](http://hg.python.org/cpython/file/61c91c7f101b/Lib/distutils)?
+What it doesn't say is that it will silently fail / delete the wrong files when filenames have spaces, along with other important limitations. I looked around at all the other answers and links from google and there was no better answer. How does this happen for a widely used package included in Python for at least [15 years](http://hg.python.org/cpython/file/61c91c7f101b/Lib/distutils)?
 
 It’s pretty standard fair: uninstall has spotty support across a great many installation technologies. I won't try to draw some broad conclusion.
 
index 34b769c..10b2119 100644 (file)
@@ -176,7 +176,7 @@ On2 = bnf_expand([O, of, ["n squared"]], [['quadratic'], O],
 print On2
 ~~~
 
-The result is 92 terms which can work the same in a conversation (unless your votes/comments say otherwise). And that doesn't even consider whether to say someting _is_ O(n²), _has_ O(n²), or _is of_ O(n²).
+The result is 92 terms which can work the same in a conversation (unless your votes/comments say otherwise). And that doesn't even consider whether to say something _is_ O(n²), _has_ O(n²), or _is of_ O(n²).
 
 The list is a bit long, so I put them in javascript and made some buttons.
 
index 0d44d6f..09a0e57 100644 (file)
@@ -18,7 +18,7 @@ Removal of "of" was slightly less popular (except for "order" which was basicall
 
 As I noted, opinions were split, with ~55% "sounds good", ~25% "sounds ok", and ~20% "sounds wrong or confusing" for each. For people who liked one of these four, they also had a preference for its minor variations, but felt average for the other three.
 
-"big oh of n squared" did have an edge, which I think is at least partially due to the fact that I used O(n²) when writting about the topic. In a proper experiment, I would have interviewed people verbally and used a random term to introduce the topic.
+"big oh of n squared" did have an edge, which I think is at least partially due to the fact that I used O(n²) when writing about the topic. In a proper experiment, I would have interviewed people verbally and used a random term to introduce the topic.
 
 There weren't any words that stood out as universally disliked, although a few awkward combinations rounded the bottom with 60% "sounds wrong or confusing." I would recommend using one of the above, or a variation, which is still about 20 options.